Posts Tagged ‘children’

Helping Our Children Weather Defeat, Adversity and Disappointment

Lori Vacek

Lori Vacek
Memorial Mommy Blogger

Children will always have opportunity to face difficulty in their lives. And the ways they deal with it are as varied as their personalities, development of coping skills, etc. As a parent, I find I want to make the hurt go away as soon as possible. But no matter how I console them, it really is about giving them time and choices.

Here are a few of the things I have learned in my 30 years of parenting that have helped my children.

  1. Triumph with them even in their defeat. Give them praise for their effort and strength of character to try.
  2. Convey that you love them and are proud of them just for being who they are.
  3. Hug them and reaffirm them with physical affection. Look in their eyes.
  4. Be genuine in your words. Comedy only helps if that is their personality. Otherwise, refrain from making jokes.
  5. Divert their attention to positive solutions or alternatives.
  6. Let them cry and express themselves while not allowing them to get into self-destructive statements or behaviors.

I’m sure you may have some great suggestions as well. But there are just a few of my best to get you started on building happy, healthy children.

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Disclaimer
The views expressed in the posts and comments of this blog do not necessarily reflect Memorial Healthcare. They should be understood as the personal opinions of the author.

Comment Policy
All readers are encouraged to leave comments. While all points of view are welcome on Memorial Healthcare’s blog, only comments that are courteous and on-topic will be posted. All comments will be reviewed and responded to (as needed) within three business days of submission. Participants on this blog are fully responsible for everything that they submit in their comments, and all posted comments are in the public domain.

Linking Policy
This blog may contain external links to other sites. Memorial Healthcare does not control or guarantee the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, or completeness of information on these Web sites. Links to particular items in hypertext are not intended as endorsements of any views expressed, products or services offered on outside sites, or the organizations sponsoring those sites.

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Advocating For My Children With Special Needs

Laura Jafri

Laura Jafri

I am very blessed with five amazing school aged children. They are all very bright and each have their own special personalities. The oldest is in 9th grade, then I have a 6th grader, 4th grader, 2nd grader and a kindergartener. This, in of itself, is a challenging household. Then, when you add the fact that two of them have special needs, that is a totally different story.

At first, I didn’t know what to expect. My only daughter (the 6th grader) has severe autism. I have learned so much from her. One thing that I have always believed was that she was very smart and I wanted her to have the best education possible. It was her right and she deserved it. WOW, I didn’t know what I was getting myself into!

Over the years, I found myself hitting many brick walls in many different areas, especially in the school system. The services that my daughter needs in order to put her anywhere near an equal playing field compared to her peers is enormous. As a parent, it was very frustrating but, not knowing any better, I would say “ok.” Well, that didn’t last too long. I quickly figured out that I don’t take no for an answer—that’s all there is to it. My child deserves the best education possible and I am going to advocate for her to make sure that is what she gets. 

That has become a huge undertaking. It doesn’t mean that it is as easy as just asking for it. I have become a very involved and proactive advocate for my child. She needs me and I am going to do it. The challenges are sometimes overwhelming for parents. Then, my youngest son was diagnosed with autism as well. Being an advocate for two children with special needs is the role that God has given me. It means endless meetings with teachers, therapists and administrators. The time commitment is huge but the emotional investment is completely overwhelming.  All any parent wants is the best for their child.  It’s so painful to feel like every day is a battle for your children. All you want is to give them the lives that they deserve but the task is great and it is life-long. 

I have been very fortunate to meet some educators right here in Owosso that are willing to travel that road with me. They are supportive and try to give me and my children what we need. You can always tell who those teachers and therapists are, because they share a sincere passion for helping your child be successful. Unfortunately, there are some that don’t share that passion. As an advocate for your children, you need to figure out who those people are and work closely with the ones that will make education both an enjoyable experience for your child, as well as a successful one. Now, I never feel like I can’t be honest with them and tell them what my expectations are. That way we can work together to achieve our goals. Then you begin the process of carrying out an education plan (IEP) that is best for your child. 

Although this process is emotionally draining it is what I need to do as my children’s advocate. It can feel like a lonely battle sometimes. I want you to know that you are not alone. I am here! If you would like additional information on this topic, you may contact me via email at laurajafri@gmail.com. I have also listed some pertinent web sites for resources on this topic below for reference.

Autism Society of Michigan

Autism Society

Autism Speaks

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Disclaimer

The views expressed in the posts and comments of this blog do not necessarily reflect Memorial Healthcare. They should be understood as the personal opinions of the author.

Comment Policy

All readers are encouraged to leave comments. While all points of view are welcome on Memorial Healthcare’s blog, only comments that are courteous and on-topic will be posted. All comments will be reviewed and responded to (as needed) within three business days of submission. Participants on this blog are fully responsible for everything that they submit in their comments, and all posted comments are in the public domain.

Linking Policy

This blog may contain external links to other sites. Memorial Healthcare does not control or guarantee the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, or completeness of information on these Web sites. Links to particular items in hypertext are not intended as endorsements of any views expressed, products or services offered on outside sites, or the organizations sponsoring those sites.