Posts Tagged ‘tracey heslip’

Please Don’t Text and Drive

Tracey (standing) with (l-r) Rachel (14), Jackie (in red) (17), and Kayleena (19)

Author Tracey Heslip (standing) with daughters (l-r) Rachel, Jackie (in red), and Kayleena

This blog is going to be short and sweet…well, maybe not so sweet.

This past week I was sitting in the Wendy’s parking lot facing M-21 at about 5:15 in the evening. I was APPALLED at how many people were texting and driving. I was there for about 15 minutes and during that time about 25% of the drivers were texting. You would think “teenage” drivers……NOPE!!!! A few were teenagers, but most were middle-aged; some with children in the back seat.

How can I tell my teenage drivers not to text for their safety and the safety of others, when their safety is at risk from other drivers? You may think that I’m over-reacting, but I think this is common sense. In the State of Michigan we have a law about texting and driving.

According to distraction.gov, using a cell phone while driving, whether it’s hand-held or hands-free, delays the driver’s reactions as much as having a blood alcohol concentration at the legal limit of .08 percent. If you are driving alone and need to text, pull over. If you have a passenger, assign them “designated texter” to text for you.

In April 2011, Memorial Healthcare hosted a “Buckle Up Stop Texting” event at the Breslin Center in East Lansing. Their keynote speaker for this event was Amanda Umscheid, of Missouri, who shared her personal experience related to the loss of her sister in a texting and driving accident. For a moving video on why you should not text and drive, which includes Amanda’s story, click here.  

To help you remember not to text and drive, Memorial Healthcare is offering free thumb bands to the community. These bands are to be worn on a driver’s thumb to remind them not to text and drive. For your free thumb band, visit Memorial’s main lobby at 826 W. King Street, Owosso.

So please, please, please do NOT text and drive.

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Disclaimer
The views expressed in the posts and comments of this blog do not necessarily reflect Memorial Healthcare. They should be understood as the personal opinions of the author.

Comment Policy
All readers are encouraged to leave comments. While all points of view are welcome on Memorial Healthcare’s blog, only comments that are courteous and on-topic will be posted. All comments will be reviewed and responded to (as needed) within three business days of submission. Participants on this blog are fully responsible for everything that they submit in their comments, and all posted comments are in the public domain.

Linking Policy
This blog may contain external links to other sites. Memorial Healthcare does not control or guarantee the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, or completeness of information on these Web sites. Links to particular items in hypertext are not intended as endorsements of any views expressed, products, or services offered on outside sites, or the organizations sponsoring those sites.

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Not a Religion, A Relationship

Tracey Heslip

Tracey Heslip

I’ve been thinking about this month’s blog for the last week. I always pray about what topic I’m going to write about and this is what the Lord has laid on my heart. Here it goes…

There are four mommy bloggers and if you have been following us you have learned a little about us. We are all happily married, we all have children, and we all have faith. We have all shared stories about our families, saving tips, and how we manage our children.  You may think we paint a rosy picture of the perfect housewife and mother, and it may be hard for some of you to take us seriously because of where you are at in your life.

You may be a single mother, or you are in a bad marriage, or perhaps you have teenagers that you find very hard to love. I would like to offer you encouragement. I don’t have all the answers to what you may be going through; however, I would like to tell you that you are not alone. I would say to you, think positive and surround yourself with positive people.  Don’t be afraid to reach out to others that may be able to help you. There are people in the community that would love to help. If you were to ask anyone of us mommy bloggers we would tell you that we draw a lot of our personal strength from our faith. Owosso has a lot of wonderful churches.

I’ve heard people say many times that they don’t want to go to church because of all the hypocrites there. I’m not saying because I believe in God that makes me perfect, far from it. What I am saying is that church gives you a sense of belonging. Churches have outreach programs that may fulfill a need in your family.

Give it a try!!! There may be a lonely grandmotherly lady that would love to adopt a family, or a gentleman who was a “wild child” in his youth that would love to take your teenage son under his wing and show him the error of his ways.

When it seems that you have nowhere else to turn, try church. Find a place where you feel comfortable and at home. The saying in my family is: It’s not a religion, it’s a relationship.

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Disclaimer

The views expressed in the posts and comments of this blog do not necessarily reflect Memorial Healthcare. They should be understood as the personal opinions of the author.

Comment Policy

All readers are encouraged to leave comments. While all points of view are welcome on Memorial Healthcare’s blog, only comments that are courteous and on-topic will be posted. All comments will be reviewed and responded to (as needed) within three business days of submission. Participants on this blog are fully responsible for everything that they submit in their comments, and all posted comments are in the public domain.

Linking Policy

This blog may contain external links to other sites. Memorial Healthcare does not control or guarantee the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, or completeness of information on these Web sites. Links to particular items in hypertext are not intended as endorsements of any views expressed, products, or services offered on outside sites, or the organizations sponsoring those sites.

Fight Those Seasonal Bugs with Fowl Brew

Tracey Heslip

by Tracey Heslip

This is the time of year that people are fighting the cold and flu. One home remedy that has been a favorite of mine is homemade chicken soup. It has the ability to just make you feel better.

Anytime you have chicken or turkey as a meal you can save the carcass. I put them in a freezer bag and store them in the freezer. When I have someone in the house with the sniffles, I pull out a couple of carcasses, put them in a big stock pot with some onions and celery, add a few seasonings, and boil it. As the water evaporates I’ll add more. You can use your own judgment on how long you boil it down. Some days I simmer all day or other days I will boil for an hour. This boiling process pulls all the vitamins and flavor out of the bones.

After you remove the bones, the possibilities are endless. You can just add noodles and seasoning to taste or use the broth for rice dishes, potato soup, bean soup, etc. — I could go on and on.

So never throw away your carcasses…make “fowl brew!”

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Disclaimer

The views expressed in the posts and comments of this blog do not necessarily reflect Memorial Healthcare. They should be understood as the personal opinions of the author.

Comment Policy

All readers are encouraged to leave comments. While all points of view are welcome on Memorial Healthcare’s blog, only comments that are courteous and on-topic will be posted. All comments will be reviewed and responded to (as needed) within three business days of submission. Participants on this blog are fully responsible for everything that they submit in their comments, and all posted comments are in the public domain.

Linking Policy

This blog may contain external links to other sites. Memorial Healthcare does not control or guarantee the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, or completeness of information on these Web sites. Links to particular items in hypertext are not intended as endorsements of any views expressed, products, or services offered on outside sites, or the organizations sponsoring those sites.

 

What’s Your New Year’s Resolution

By: Tracey Heslip
Memorial Mommy Blogger

This is the time of season when people start to think about the New Year.  What kind of commitments or resolutions are they going to make?  I would like to share some helpful tips and links to help you with one of the most common New Year’s resolution, weight loss.

This past August I was really not feeling well and went to the doctor. After several tests, we found out that my gall bladder doesn’t work.  During a consult with Dr. Nathan Tomita, we decided that I would keep my gall bladder but change my diet to see if the pain I was having would go away.  After one week on a very low-fat diet, I could tell a major difference.  Not only were my food choices low-fat, I was also eating less.

Two years ago I had given up fast food and I had already felt that my food choices were good.  I wasn’t eating a lot of processed food or dairy. Now when I say fat-free, I’m not talking about going shopping and buying everything you normally would just in the fat-free option.  I’m talking about cutting way back on portion sizes and reading labels. You’d be surprised at what the fat content is in some of your favorite foods.

Almond milk has been a huge help in transitioning to my new way of eating and is my new favorite food.  It has a lot of vitamins and comes in dark chocolate.  My family can sit down and eat a bowl of ice cream at night and I can get a glass of almond milk and not feel deprived.  If you’d rather try rice milk or soy those are options also.

Another huge help has been myfitnesspal.com. It works like Facebook where you can add friends and encourage each other.  There are different privacy settings that you can choose if you want people to be able to view your food diary or not.  My name on fitness pal is jtheslip.  Feel free to ask to be my friend so we can encourage each other throughout the year. The thing I like most about myfitnesspal.com is the food diary. It automatically figures your daily target calorie intake by using your height and weight measurements.  You fill in your food diary and it gives you a complete breakdown of fats, sugar, carbs, sodium, and protein. This will totally amaze you!!! It also has an exercise log and it will calculate how many calories you’ve burned.

I’ve lost over 20 pounds and I feel great! I’m not done losing; I have a long way to go. This is only the beginning. The year 2012 will be the year of exercise for me as I plan to supplement my healthy eating with keeping my body in motion.

I would like to wish everyone a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

What will your New Year’s resolution be?

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Disclaimer
The views expressed in the posts and comments of this blog do not necessarily reflect Memorial Healthcare. They should be understood as the personal opinions of the author.

Comment Policy
All readers are encouraged to leave comments. While all points of view are welcome on Memorial Healthcare’s blog, only comments that are courteous and on-topic will be posted. All comments will be reviewed and responded to (as needed) within three business days of submission. Participants on this blog are fully responsible for everything that they submit in their comments, and all posted comments are in the public domain.

Linking Policy
This blog may contain external links to other sites. Memorial Healthcare does not control or guarantee the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, or completeness of information on these Web sites. Links to particular items in hypertext are not intended as endorsements of any views expressed, products, or services offered on outside sites, or the organizations sponsoring those sites.

Women and Car Repairs

Tracey Heslip

Tracey Heslip

There is a lot of hype about mechanics not treating women fairly. My husband is a mechanic, so I thought I would give some guidelines for not getting taken advantage of. 

  • Always make sure that your mechanic is state licensed. If you think about it, you wouldn’t want to go to a doctor or a beautician that wasn’t licensed. Why would your car repair be any different?  The facility where you take your car should have the mechanic’s license visibly displayed.
  • Ask around. Ask your friends, neighbors, and co-workers where they take their car and if they were happy with the service they received. If someone is a good/ bad mechanic, word will spread. 
  • Every care is different. Some mechanics suggest repairs based on your cars mileage, not on the work needing to be done.  Now think about this, every car is different. You can have two cars that have 50,000 miles each but one is 10 years older than the other. One is garage kept and one is not. One spends winters in Florida and one in Michigan (with snow and salt). Get the picture?Women and Car Repairs
  • Get an oil change every three months or 3,000 miles (whichever comes first). If you have this done at a shop that checks all fluid levels, tire pressure, and does a visual inspection of things like air filter and belts, this could catch things early and save you a big expensive repair.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask questions. The only dumb question is one not asked.
  • Get to know your car. Know its sounds and smells. It’s better to bring your car to a mechanic to find out it’s nothing or a small fix then to keep driving it with a noise or a pull to the right or left. Letting things go can mean more damage and more money spent to fix it.
  • Prepare for winter. Now is the time of year to make sure your anti-freeze is rated for -34 degrees. Checking it now can save your hoses from freezing and breaking.

So, ladies, if you’re the one making the car repair decisions in the household, find an honest, reliable, licensed mechanic. Your car and pocketbook will thank you.

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Disclaimer
The views expressed in the posts and comments of this blog do not necessarily reflect Memorial Healthcare. They should be understood as the personal opinions of the author.

Comment Policy
All readers are encouraged to leave comments. While all points of view are welcome on Memorial Healthcare’s blog, only comments that are courteous and on-topic will be posted. All comments will be reviewed and responded to (as needed) within three business days of submission. Participants on this blog are fully responsible for everything that they submit in their comments, and all posted comments are in the public domain.

Linking Policy
This blog may contain external links to other sites. Memorial Healthcare does not control or guarantee the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, or completeness of information on these Web sites. Links to particular items in hypertext are not intended as endorsements of any views expressed, products, or services offered on outside sites, or the organizations sponsoring those sites.

Talk, Talk, Talk, Talk, and Talk Some More

By Tracey Heslip

Tracey (standing) with (l-r) Rachel (14), Jackie (in red) (17), and Kayleena (19)

Tracey (standing) with (l-r) Rachel (14), Jackie (in red) (17), and Kayleena (19)

I have three teenage girls and yes, my husband’s hair is grey. People tease him about having a shot gun by the front door.

When the girls were very young, I started reading about the teen years. Jim would say, “They’re only toddlers now, what are you reading about stuff like that for?”  I felt that I needed to prepare for the teen years very early on. I really prayed about how I wanted to approach the very trying, peer pressure years.

First, I wanted very open communication with my girls; I wanted them to feel like they could come and talk to me about anything and everything. Secondly, I wanted them to be very educated. I didn’t just want to tell them no, I wanted them to know why I was telling them no.

It’s not enough to let the public school system or your child’s peers educate them; it’s our job to set standards. Decide early on how and when you are going to talk to your children. You don’t have to give them everything at age 10, but give them enough so that when they’re sitting on the bus and the kid next to them is telling them everything, they feel comfortable enough to come and tell you. That way, you can answer questions or tell them what you want to tell them. If you think you just can’t do that—it’s too “awkward,” think of how awkward it would be if your child comes to you pregnant, or you get a phone call from a parent saying that your child is drunk.

It’s our responsibility, as parents, to educate and protect our children. Educate yourself first; find out what kids these days are up against. There are tons of books out there to help you. My girls have participated in peer study groups offered through the Pregnancy Resource Center. Most of the studies are Bible based and have girls from all walks of life and religious backgrounds. This has assured them that it’s not just mom and dad telling them things,  there are others in their peer group who have the same goals and morals.

Some of the studies are done with books by Lisa Bevere, an inspirational speaker and author who tells girls they don’t need a boyfriend to identify them and that they are beautiful just the way they are. 

A topic often discussed at our house is courtship verses dating. We have taught our girls that dating is for the purpose of marriage. If you can’t see yourself being married to the person, or them being the father of your children, you have no reason to be with them. It used to be that a boy had to ask permission from the girl’s family before “going out,” and that they went out in groups. We, as a society, and parents, have gotten away from traditions and formalities. Now, the guy pulls in the driveway and honks the horn, or they hook up at functions without the parent’s knowledge. I am not going to be a mother that says my kids would never do that. I know that they have free will. However, I have the peace of mind that I have given them ALL the facts.

Please, please, PLEASE, talk to your children. Start young with age-appropriate information. Build a foundation that will follow through to the teen years and into adulthood. I can guarantee that you will never look back and say, “I wish I had never talked to them about that.”

Note: This blog has been edited from the author’s original submission.

Dateable: Are You? Are They? By Justin Lookadoo & Hayley DiMarco 

How to Talk to Your Child About Sex: It’s Best to Start Early, but It’s Never Too Late—A Step-by-Step Guide for Parents by Linda & Richard Eyre

Kiss the Girls and Made Them Cry by Lisa Bevere 

Fight Like a Girl by Lisa Bevere

Disclaimer

The views expressed in the posts and comments of this blog do not necessarily reflect Memorial Healthcare. They should be understood as the personal opinions of the author.

Comment Policy

All readers are encouraged to leave comments. While all points of view are welcome on Memorial Healthcare’s blog, only comments that are courteous and on-topic will be posted. All comments will be reviewed and responded to (as needed) within three business days of submission. Participants on this blog are fully responsible for everything that they submit in their comments, and all posted comments are in the public domain.

Linking Policy

This blog may contain external links to other sites. Memorial Healthcare does not control or guarantee the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, or completeness of information on these Web sites. Links to particular items in hypertext are not intended as endorsements of any views expressed, products or services offered on outside sites, or the organizations sponsoring those sites.

Be Prepared!

Tracey HeslipBy: Tracey Heslip
Memorial Healthcare Mommy Blogger

A couple of years ago, I was sitting for an elderly couple, one of which needed a home health care nurse. During one of the nurse’s visits, the nurse was instructing us to make sure that there was at least two weeks’ worth of medications on hand, in a travel bag ready to go. I asked why, and she said that it was recommended in the case of an emergency. By having this packed and ready it would be accessible at a moments notice. That got me thinking…

Now, I don’t like to live in a state of fear, and really Y2K never happened. In August, 2005, the world did not end, but Hurricane Katrina did happen. Arkansas tornadoes did happen. Other disasters have happened. I bet a lot of people thought after these events, “I wish I had done this or I wish I had done that.” I started to think…”What kind of proactive things can I do to keep my family from being totally devastated in an emergency or something like losing a job or being sick for an extended period of time?”Hurricane

I would like to challenge you to look in your kitchen cupboards and think of this scenario, “Tomorrow we lose our income. How long would this food last? Or, there is an epidemic and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) issues a health warning for everyone to be quarantined, or we have a major wide-spread power outage, or a severe snow storm.

If there was a power outage how would you heat/cool your house? Do you have candles or oil lamps for lights? If so, do you know where they are? Did you know that a candle in a coffee can provides enough warmth for survival?

What about drinking water? After an emergency such as a tornado, flood or earthquake, the water that comes out of your tap might not be safe to drink — if it’s running at all. That’s why you need to have at least a three-day supply of bottled water stored at home at all times.

Car In SnowAlso, what kind of emergency supplies do you have in your car? Having cell phones gives us a false sense of security. What if you run off the road in a snow storm, your cell phone is dead and your car won’t start – how are you going to stay warm? A small bag or box in your trunk could make the difference of death or survival; a blanket, flashlight, energy bar and a bottle of water, preferably for more than one person.

This is all just food for thought. This blog isn’t meant to give you a sense of fear, but to challenge you to be prepared. As I sit here writing, there has been an earthquake in Virginia.  John Leach, author of Survival Psychology, writes: “In an emergency, 75% of people have to be told what to do. Only 10 -15% of the people act appropriately leaving the remaining 10 – 15% sitting on the sidelines acting inappropriately!” We are not exempt from catastrophe; however, will you be in the top 15% who have prepared for the event you may find yourself in?

I walked away from writing this blog for a few days. As I came back, I am listening to reports from The Weather Channel of New York City being evacuated. So, I repeat BE PREPARED! How long would it take you to evacuate at a moment’s notice?

www.ready.gov

www.thesurvivalmom.com